Reader's Corner No. 90: Beyonce.com Lawsuit Reminds Us How Shitty the Web Is for the Visually Impaired, iPad Pro as a Main Computer, and How Doom Fire was Done

January 10, 2019

This week's Reader's Corner is covering articles related to accessibility, UX, and game development! Read on to see why accessibility has gone mainstream thanks to Beyonce Knowles, hear one argument for using an iPad pro as your main computer, and learn how the fire feature from the game "Doom" was developed.


Beyonce.com Lawsuit Reminds Us How Shitty the Web Is for Users With Visual Impairment

David Minton

Source: Gizmodo

Takeaway: A question we ask every client during discovery meetings is what (if any) accessibility standard do they want, or need the project to meet. While we follow best practices to create accessible website frameworks, all too often, when we try to explain the effort necessary in preparing and maintaining content to meet accessibility standards, those that don’t feel they are required to do so often decide not to dedicate the needed effort to accommodate users with disabilities. Unfortunately, the legal requirements aren’t clear as to who the ADA applies to when it comes to website accessibility, and maybe the latest lawsuit, against Beyoncé Knowles’ entertainment company Parkwood Entertainment will promote a better understanding of the societal need for website accessibility, as well as defining clearer legal guidelines.

Tags: #Accessibility, #InternetLaw


Using the iPad Pro as My Main Computer

Frank Yonnetti

Source: Hicks Design

Takeaway: I typically enjoy anything Jon Hicks throws down and this post is another good one. Personally, I can't see using an iPad Pro as my main computer, but Jon brings out that he would have felt the same way if it wasn't for the Apple Pencil. It's a game changer for him and having tried out the Pencil myself I can see why. I love to draw and Apple seems to have closed the gap between paper and glass screens.

Tags: #Apple, #iPad, #Mac


How Doom Fire was Done

David Gouch

Source: Fabien Sanglard

Takeaway: An example of accomplishing a lot with a little by relying on simplification and ‘good enough.’ The fire isn’t a scientifically accurate simulation of nature, but it works within the constraints of 1990s CPUs, and this version with its imperfections is much cooler than a version that never got shipped because it wasn’t perfect.

Tags: #Graphics, #Gaming


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